Topic: Carthaginian War; Cato the elder was a Roman Senator and known for saying the words "Carthago delenda est!" It means that Carthage must be destroyed. It marks the end of Carthage.

Topic: Carthaginian War; Cato the elder was a Roman Senator and known for saying the words "Carthago delenda est!" It means that Carthage must be destroyed. It marks the end of Carthage.

Marcus Porcius Cato  (Cato the Elder.) ~ "Tis sometimes the height of wisdom to feign stupidity."  (234 BC – 149 BC), Roman statesman, often called "The Censor".

Marcus Porcius Cato (Cato the Elder.) ~ "Tis sometimes the height of wisdom to feign stupidity." (234 BC – 149 BC), Roman statesman, often called "The Censor".

Marcus Porcius Cato Uticensis (95 BC, Rome – April 46 BC, Utica), commonly known as Cato the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather (Cato the Elder), was a politician and statesman in the late Roman Republic, and a follower of the Stoic philosophy. A noted orator, he is remembered for his stubbornness and tenacity, as well as his immunity to bribes, his moral integrity, and his famous distaste for the ubiquitous corruption of the period.

Marcus Porcius Cato Uticensis (95 BC, Rome – April 46 BC, Utica), commonly known as Cato the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather (Cato the Elder), was a politician and statesman in the late Roman Republic, and a follower of the Stoic philosophy. A noted orator, he is remembered for his stubbornness and tenacity, as well as his immunity to bribes, his moral integrity, and his famous distaste for the ubiquitous corruption of the period.

CARTHAGO DELENDA EST. At the height of the Punic Wars, fought between Rome and Carthage from 264-146BC, a Roman statesman named Cato the Elder had a habit of ending all of his speeches to the Senate with the motto "Carthago delenda est," or "Carthage must be destroyed." His words quickly became a popular and rousing motto in Ancient Rome, and nowadays can be used figuratively to express your absolute support for an idea or course of action.

CARTHAGO DELENDA EST. At the height of the Punic Wars, fought between Rome and Carthage from 264-146BC, a Roman statesman named Cato the Elder had a habit of ending all of his speeches to the Senate with the motto "Carthago delenda est," or "Carthage must be destroyed." His words quickly became a popular and rousing motto in Ancient Rome, and nowadays can be used figuratively to express your absolute support for an idea or course of action.

Cato the Elder 234 BC – 149 BC.  Served as tribune, aedile, prator, consul, censor.  Known for trying to preserve the mos majorum (“ancestral custom”) and combat "degenerate" Hellenistic influences.

Cato the Elder 234 BC – 149 BC. Served as tribune, aedile, prator, consul, censor. Known for trying to preserve the mos majorum (“ancestral custom”) and combat "degenerate" Hellenistic influences.

Carthage. Cata the Elder 150BC   Carthage. Cata the Elder 150BC Carthage must be destroyed. (Cato the Elder said this in 150BC. (Ancient Carthage would now be a suburb of Tunis in Tunisia.)  http://www.finelifeart.com/carthage-cata-the-elder-150bc/

Carthage. Cata the Elder 150BC Carthage. Cata the Elder 150BC Carthage must be destroyed. (Cato the Elder said this in 150BC. (Ancient Carthage would now be a suburb of Tunis in Tunisia.) http://www.finelifeart.com/carthage-cata-the-elder-150bc/

Workers, De informatione principum (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 7); Cato the Elder, Laelius and Scipio, Cato Major de Senectute (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 123), c. 1450

Workers, De informatione principum (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 7); Cato the Elder, Laelius and Scipio, Cato Major de Senectute (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 123), c. 1450

Merchants, De informatione principum (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 7); Cato the Elder, Laelius and Scipio, Cato Major de Senectute (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 123), c. 1450

Merchants, De informatione principum (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 7); Cato the Elder, Laelius and Scipio, Cato Major de Senectute (BNF Fr. 126, fol. 123), c. 1450

Initial letter M depicting Marcus Porcius Cato the Censor, Cato the Elder, miniature from In libris epitomatum illustriorum virorum Plutarchi, by Pietro Candido Decembrio (1392-1477), parchment manuscript, cod CCXXXIX, folio 88, recto. Italy, 15th century.

Initial letter M depicting Marcus Porcius Cato the Censor, Cato the Elder, miniature from In libris epitomatum illustriorum virorum Plutarchi, by Pietro Candido Decembrio (1392-1477), parchment manuscript, cod CCXXXIX, folio 88, recto. Italy, 15th century.

Sage advice from Cato the Elder @roughromanmemes  #ancientrome #ancienthistory #sculpture #ancient #carthage #memes #rome #cato #historynerd

Sage advice from Cato the Elder @roughromanmemes #ancientrome #ancienthistory #sculpture #ancient #carthage #memes #rome #cato #historynerd

LAUGHING AUGURS "Cicero wondered how two augurs could meet without bursting into laughter at the absurdity of their profession" - lithograph by Planetta in Jose Coroleu, 'Las Supersticiones de la Humanidad' 1891) volume 2 page 156; cf. the De Divinatione, where an anecdote from Cato the Elder is given.

LAUGHING AUGURS "Cicero wondered how two augurs could meet without bursting into laughter at the absurdity of their profession" - lithograph by Planetta in Jose Coroleu, 'Las Supersticiones de la Humanidad' 1891) volume 2 page 156; cf. the De Divinatione, where an anecdote from Cato the Elder is given.

Tuscolo1 - Cato the Elder - Wikipedia

Tuscolo1 - Cato the Elder - Wikipedia

In Praise of Cabbage! by Cato the Elder

In Praise of Cabbage! by Cato the Elder

Hannibal crossing the Alps during the Second Punic War - Punic Wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hannibal crossing the Alps during the Second Punic War - Punic Wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Grasp the subject, the words will follow."  Cato the Elder #writing #plainlanguage #quotation

"Grasp the subject, the words will follow." Cato the Elder #writing #plainlanguage #quotation

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