Epigenome of cardiac muscle cell mapped. Pharmacologists have succeeded in mapping the epigenome of cardiac muscle cells.

Epigenome of cardiac muscle cell mapped

Epigenome of cardiac muscle cell mapped. Pharmacologists have succeeded in mapping the epigenome of cardiac muscle cells.

047 Action Potentials and Contraction in Cardiac Muscle Cells | Interactive Biology, with Leslie Samuel

047 Action Potentials and Contraction in Cardiac Muscle Cells | Interactive Biology, with Leslie Samuel

Investigators have learned how cardiac muscle cells react to a certain type of injury that can be caused by open-heart surgery. The findings point to a new potential way to help these hearts recover more completely. The cells, known as cardiomyocytes, can be damaged by the process of stopping and starting the heart during surgeries that use cardiopulmonary bypass machines to take over the heart's functions.

How cells react to injury from open-heart surgery: Research identifies a new potential way to help cardiac muscle recover from procedures

Investigators have learned how cardiac muscle cells react to a certain type of injury that can be caused by open-heart surgery. The findings point to a new potential way to help these hearts recover more completely. The cells, known as cardiomyocytes, can be damaged by the process of stopping and starting the heart during surgeries that use cardiopulmonary bypass machines to take over the heart's functions.

Scientists Grow Human Heart Tissue on Spinach Leaves   Its no secret that spinach is a heart-healthy vegetable. But the leafy green may one day play a new role in keeping your ticker running.  Researchers at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute have grown beating human heart cells on spinach leaves.  When I looked at the spinach leaf its stem reminded me of an aorta WPI graduate student Joshua Gershlak said in a statement comparing the veiny vegetable to the main artery in the human body. I…

Scientists Grow Human Heart Tissue on Spinach Leaves Its no secret that spinach is a heart-healthy vegetable. But the leafy green may one day play a new role in keeping your ticker running. Researchers at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute have grown beating human heart cells on spinach leaves. When I looked at the spinach leaf its stem reminded me of an aorta WPI graduate student Joshua Gershlak said in a statement comparing the veiny vegetable to the main artery in the human body. I…

Growth of the zebrafish heart from embryo to adult is tracked using colored cardiac muscle clones, each containing many cellular progeny of a single cardiac muscle cell.  Here, a large clone of green cardiac muscle cells (top) expands over the surface of many smaller clones in a growing heart. Photo credit: Vikas Gupta

Growth of the zebrafish heart from embryo to adult is tracked using colored cardiac muscle clones, each containing many cellular progeny of a single cardiac muscle cell. Here, a large clone of green cardiac muscle cells (top) expands over the surface of many smaller clones in a growing heart. Photo credit: Vikas Gupta

Vinculin needed for aging heart http://www.news-medical.net/news/20150618/Vinculin-protein-levels-increase-with-age-to-alter-shape-performance-of-cardiac-muscle-cells.aspx muscle cells

Vinculin needed for aging heart http://www.news-medical.net/news/20150618/Vinculin-protein-levels-increase-with-age-to-alter-shape-performance-of-cardiac-muscle-cells.aspx muscle cells

The entire heart muscle in young children may be capable of regeneration. In young mice 15 days old, cardiac muscle cells undergo a precisely timed spurt of cell division lasting around a day. This previously unobserved phenomenon contradicts the long-held idea that cardiac muscle cells do not divide after the first few days of life.

Spurt of heart muscle cell division seen in mice well after birth: Implications for repair of congenital heart defects

The entire heart muscle in young children may be capable of regeneration. In young mice 15 days old, cardiac muscle cells undergo a precisely timed spurt of cell division lasting around a day. This previously unobserved phenomenon contradicts the long-held idea that cardiac muscle cells do not divide after the first few days of life.

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