Awesome The Montgomery Bus Boycott - The Catalyst That Jump Started The Civil Rights Movement

Awesome The Montgomery Bus Boycott - The Catalyst That Jump Started The Civil Rights Movement

The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding on December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama when she was arrested for her refusal to give up her seat to a white person which sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

The No. 2857 bus on which Rosa Parks was riding on December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama when she was arrested for her refusal to give up her seat to a white person which sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott begins | African American Registry.....Montgomery Bus-Boycott starts

The Montgomery Bus Boycott begins | African American Registry.....Montgomery Bus-Boycott starts

Civil Rights Mug Shots: Heroes Of The Montgomery Bus Boycott And Freedom Rides - Flashbak

Civil Rights Mug Shots: Heroes Of The Montgomery Bus Boycott And Freedom Rides - Flashbak

While most people remember Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, they forget that the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeeded because of the participation of tens of thousands of ordinary people.  These women and men risked their lives and jobs to keep the boycott alive.  Many, like this woman, walked instead of riding the segregated buses.

While most people remember Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, they forget that the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeeded because of the participation of tens of thousands of ordinary people. These women and men risked their lives and jobs to keep the boycott alive. Many, like this woman, walked instead of riding the segregated buses.

December 1, 1955 In response to the Rosa Parks incident, a bus boycott in Montgomery, a political and and social protest campaign came about. The main purpose and goal of the bus boycott was to oppose the city's policy of racial segregation on public transportation. This boycott lasted from December 1, 1955 until December 20, 1956, and ended with a United States Supreme Court ruling that Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses unconstitutional.

December 1, 1955 In response to the Rosa Parks incident, a bus boycott in Montgomery, a political and and social protest campaign came about. The main purpose and goal of the bus boycott was to oppose the city's policy of racial segregation on public transportation. This boycott lasted from December 1, 1955 until December 20, 1956, and ended with a United States Supreme Court ruling that Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses unconstitutional.

On May 26, 1956 Florida A Students Carrie Patterson and Wilhemina Jakes were arrested in Tallahassee for refusing to give up their bus seats. NAACP officials CK Steele and Edwin Norwood (shown) begin negotiations with city officials as students launch a year-long bus boycott. Timeline: http://www.tallahassee.com/legacy/special/boycott/timeline.html #TodayInBlackHistory

On May 26, 1956 Florida A Students Carrie Patterson and Wilhemina Jakes were arrested in Tallahassee for refusing to give up their bus seats. NAACP officials CK Steele and Edwin Norwood (shown) begin negotiations with city officials as students launch a year-long bus boycott. Timeline: http://www.tallahassee.com/legacy/special/boycott/timeline.html #TodayInBlackHistory

The arrest report from Montgomery, Alabama police for Rosa Parks on Dec. 1, 1955, the day she rode a  Montgomery city bus and refused to get up and move to the back of the bus so a white man could take her seat, as she was expected to do.  This arrest led to the start of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Rosa Parks’s official arrest report: She refused to give bus seat to white man 58 years ago today

The arrest report from Montgomery, Alabama police for Rosa Parks on Dec. 1, 1955, the day she rode a Montgomery city bus and refused to get up and move to the back of the bus so a white man could take her seat, as she was expected to do. This arrest led to the start of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

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