В одном из самых знаковых картин из Второй мировой войны, морской напитки из своей фляги во время битвы Сайпан, 1944. (У. Юджин Смит времени и Жизнь Картинки / Getty Images) ======================== In one of the most iconic pictures from WWII, a marine drinks from his canteen during the Battle of Saipan, 1944. (W. Eugene Smith—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

World War II: Photos We Remember

В одном из самых знаковых картин из Второй мировой войны, морской напитки из своей фляги во время битвы Сайпан, 1944. (У. Юджин Смит времени и Жизнь Картинки / Getty Images) ======================== In one of the most iconic pictures from WWII, a marine drinks from his canteen during the Battle of Saipan, 1944. (W. Eugene Smith—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

TIL an 18 year old marine, Guy Gabaldon, singlehandedly persuaded 1,500 Japanese soldiers at the battle of Saipan to surrender. He was only able to do this because his japanese foster parents had taken him in off the streets when he was 12 and taught him their language.

TIL an 18 year old marine, Guy Gabaldon, singlehandedly persuaded 1,500 Japanese soldiers at the battle of Saipan to surrender. He was only able to do this because his japanese foster parents had taken him in off the streets when he was 12 and taught him their language.

.WORLD WAR II. The Pacific Campaign. June 1944. Battle of Saipan Island. US Marine holding a wounded and dying baby found in the mountains - Photo W. Eugene Smith

PHOTOS: The Best War Photography In The World

.WORLD WAR II. The Pacific Campaign. June 1944. Battle of Saipan Island. US Marine holding a wounded and dying baby found in the mountains - Photo W. Eugene Smith

"First African American Marines decorated by the famed Second Marine Division somewhere in the Pacific (left to right) Staff Sgt Timerlate Kirven...and Cpl. Samuel J. Love, Sr... They received Purple Hearts for wounds received in the Battle of Saipan..."

"First African American Marines decorated by the famed Second Marine Division somewhere in the Pacific (left to right) Staff Sgt Timerlate Kirven...and Cpl. Samuel J. Love, Sr... They received Purple Hearts for wounds received in the Battle of Saipan..."

A U.S. Marine during the Battle of Saipan. June 27, 1944. Photo by W. Eugene Smith.

A U.S. Marine during the Battle of Saipan. June 27, 1944. Photo by W. Eugene Smith.

An American soldier cradles a wounded Japanese boy and shelters him from the rain in the cockpit of an airplane during the Battle of Saipan while waiting to transport the youngster to a field hospital. July, 1944. [OS][1500 × 1269] : HistoryPorn

An American soldier cradles a wounded Japanese boy and shelters him from the rain in the cockpit of an airplane during the Battle of Saipan while waiting to transport the youngster to a field hospital. July, 1944. [OS][1500 × 1269] : HistoryPorn

The Battle of Saipan began on June 15, 1944.  Navajo codetalkers such as these played a crucial role in directing naval artillery during the 24 day battle.

The Battle of Saipan began on June 15, 1944. Navajo codetalkers such as these played a crucial role in directing naval artillery during the 24 day battle.

William H. “Bill” Genaust, USMC, war photographer who is most famous for capturing the Flag Raising on Iwo Jima. Killed in action  March 4, 1945.

William H. “Bill” Genaust, USMC, war photographer who is most famous for capturing the Flag Raising on Iwo Jima. Killed in action March 4, 1945.

A grizzled, weary American peers over his shoulder during the final days of fighting during the July, 1944 Battle of Saipan. The pivotal Allied victory there, 1,500 miles south of Tokyo, was earned at the cost of 3,000 American lives. This picture — easily among the most striking and immediately recognizable of LIFE’s countless war photos — was the 1940s equivalent of saying to the American public: We didn’t start this fight. But we’re going to finish it.

World War II photographs show American soldiers' fight for survival in brutal Battle of Saipan

A grizzled, weary American peers over his shoulder during the final days of fighting during the July, 1944 Battle of Saipan. The pivotal Allied victory there, 1,500 miles south of Tokyo, was earned at the cost of 3,000 American lives. This picture — easily among the most striking and immediately recognizable of LIFE’s countless war photos — was the 1940s equivalent of saying to the American public: We didn’t start this fight. But we’re going to finish it.

My father served here in WWII. He was an anti aircraft gunner with D Battery, 501st AAA (Anti Aircraft Artillery) Battalion. from Rare World War II Photographs of American Soldiers' In Brutal Battle Of Saipan

My father served here in WWII. He was an anti aircraft gunner with D Battery, 501st AAA (Anti Aircraft Artillery) Battalion. from Rare World War II Photographs of American Soldiers' In Brutal Battle Of Saipan

A Japanese plane is shot down during the battle of Saipan in 1944

A Japanese plane is shot down during the battle of Saipan in 1944

American soldier offers his hand to a woman emerging from a cave where she had hidden with her child. (Saipan, 1944)

World War II photographs show American soldiers' fight for survival in brutal Battle of Saipan

American soldier offers his hand to a woman emerging from a cave where she had hidden with her child. (Saipan, 1944)

WORLD WAR II. The Pacific Campaign. June 1944. Battle of Saipan Island. US soldier looking for Japanese soldiers.

WORLD WAR II. The Pacific Campaign. June 1944. Battle of Saipan Island. US soldier looking for Japanese soldiers.

US Marine Looking at Bodies of Dead Japanese Soldiers Killed During Battle For Control of Saipan

US Marine Looking at Bodies of Dead Japanese Soldiers Killed During Battle For Control of Saipan

Marine, pictured in July looks at the bodies of dead Japanese soldiers killed during the battle for control of Saipan.Nearly Japanese troops died

<b>Unpublished. </b>A crew maneuvers an enormous piece of artillery during the Battle of Saipan, 1944. In the waning days of the struggle for the island, thousands of Japanese civilians and troops committed suicide, rather than surrender to American troops. Many leapt to their death from the top of sheer cliffs that fall 200 feet to rocks and surf below.

World War II: Photos We Remember

<b>Unpublished. </b>A crew maneuvers an enormous piece of artillery during the Battle of Saipan, 1944. In the waning days of the struggle for the island, thousands of Japanese civilians and troops committed suicide, rather than surrender to American troops. Many leapt to their death from the top of sheer cliffs that fall 200 feet to rocks and surf below.

A marine moves on to catch up with his unit after he has covered a dead comrade with a poncho cover and marked his position with his bayoneted rifle. Battle of Saipan, 1944.

A marine moves on to catch up with his unit after he has covered a dead comrade with a poncho cover and marked his position with his bayoneted rifle. Battle of Saipan, 1944.

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