Italy. Arch of Constantine, Rome.  The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312.

Italy. Arch of Constantine, Rome. The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312.

Arch of Constantine - Rome After years of civil war, the victory of Constantine's army over the numerically superior army of Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312 AD brought some peace to the Roman Empire. To commemorate this victory, the Senate of Rome awarded Arch of Constantine a triumphal arch. It was dedicated just a few years later, in 315 AD.

Arch of Constantine - Rome After years of civil war, the victory of Constantine's army over the numerically superior army of Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312 AD brought some peace to the Roman Empire. To commemorate this victory, the Senate of Rome awarded Arch of Constantine a triumphal arch. It was dedicated just a few years later, in 315 AD.

ARCH OF CONSTANTINE: This huge triumphal arch (21 meters high), with 3 passageways, was erected to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius in 312. It incorporates recycled sculpture from earlier monuments, in part as some suggest, because creativity and technical skill had fallen off by this time period, but perhaps also because of a desire to associate Constantine with the "good emperors" Trajan, Hadrian, and Marcus Aurelius, whose monuments were cannibalized for sculpture.

ARCH OF CONSTANTINE: This huge triumphal arch (21 meters high), with 3 passageways, was erected to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius in 312. It incorporates recycled sculpture from earlier monuments, in part as some suggest, because creativity and technical skill had fallen off by this time period, but perhaps also because of a desire to associate Constantine with the "good emperors" Trajan, Hadrian, and Marcus Aurelius, whose monuments were cannibalized for sculpture.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS: Arch of Constantine, Rome, Italy ( 312 CE): Commemorating Constantine's victory over Maxentius, re-uses parts of earlier buildings.  Orders set out proportions of arch.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS: Arch of Constantine, Rome, Italy ( 312 CE): Commemorating Constantine's victory over Maxentius, re-uses parts of earlier buildings. Orders set out proportions of arch.

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