Syriac is a dialect of Middle Aramaic that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. Having first appeared as a script in the 1st century AD after being spoken as an unwritten language for five centuries, Classical Syriac became a major literary language throughout the Middle East from the 4th to the 8th centuries, the classical language of Edessa, preserved in a large body of Syriac literature. Syriac is a Middle Aramaic language.

Syriac, Aramaic, and Mandaic: Learn One Language, Three Dialects, For The Price Of Five Alphabets

The Lord's Prayer in Aramaic : my tattoo :) ima have to learn this by heart.

The Lord's Prayer in Aramaic : my tattoo :) ima have to learn this by heart.

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

ARAMAIC  The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

ARAMAIC The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

Aramaic alphabet

Aramaic alphabet

Aramaic language (Wikipedia) - "Mandaic magical 'demon trap'"

Aramaic language (Wikipedia) - "Mandaic magical 'demon trap'"

Aramaic language- love the soundbytes on this page

Aramaic language- love the soundbytes on this page

Reading Hebrew Tombstones

Reading Hebrew Tombstones

The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

In its 3,000-year written history, Aramaic has served as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship. It was the language that Jesus Christ used the most, the language of large sections of the biblical books of Daniel and Ezra, and is the language of the Talmud. Jewish Aramaic was different from the other forms both in lettering and grammar. Parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls are in Jewish Aramaic showing the Jewish lettering, related to the unique Hebrew script.

In its 3,000-year written history, Aramaic has served as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship. It was the language that Jesus Christ used the most, the language of large sections of the biblical books of Daniel and Ezra, and is the language of the Talmud. Jewish Aramaic was different from the other forms both in lettering and grammar. Parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls are in Jewish Aramaic showing the Jewish lettering, related to the unique Hebrew script.

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