Anvers Island, Antarctica moon rise over sea ice. The Antarctic Half of the Global Thermohaline Circulation is Faltering.- Article

Anvers Island, Antarctica moon rise over sea ice. The Antarctic Half of the Global Thermohaline Circulation is Faltering.- Article

pin 25
heart 9
Antarctica Anvers Island Silhouette of Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) standing at dusk in rookery near Port Lockroy Canvas Art - Paul Souders Design Pics (19 x 12)

Antarctica Anvers Island Silhouette of Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) standing at dusk in rookery near Port Lockroy Canvas Art - Paul Souders Design Pics (19 x 12)

Natural arch in a glacier at Norsel Point, Anvers Island, Antarctica  (Glenn Grant/National Science Foundation)

Natural arch in a glacier at Norsel Point, Anvers Island, Antarctica (Glenn Grant/National Science Foundation)

pin 55
heart 4
The Gerlache Strait separating the Palmer Archipelago from the Antarctic Peninsular off Anvers Island

The Gerlache Strait separating the Palmer Archipelago from the Antarctic Peninsular off Anvers Island

pin 1
Palmer Station, on Anvers Island, is Antarctica's only US station north of the Antarctic Circle. Initial construction of the station finished in 1968.

Palmer Station, on Anvers Island, is Antarctica's only US station north of the Antarctic Circle. Initial construction of the station finished in 1968.

pin 2
Starting the night ascent of Mt Agamemnon with view over the Marr Ice Piedmont, Anvers Island. Antarctic Peninsula © Dave

Starting the night ascent of Mt Agamemnon with view over the Marr Ice Piedmont, Anvers Island. Antarctic Peninsula © Dave

pin 1
While not an Ice Breaker, the National Geographic Explorer is capable of slicing its way through sea ice that's up to about 2-3 feet thick.  This movie was taken within the beautiful Lemaire Channel of  Anvers Island, Antarctica and gives you a feel of what it looks like looking down off the bow of the boat while cutting some thin sea ice.    Near the end of the movie, you can see the "bulbous bow" feature of the boat underneath the surface of the water.  This protrusion off the boat's bow…

While not an Ice Breaker, the National Geographic Explorer is capable of slicing its way through sea ice that's up to about 2-3 feet thick. This movie was taken within the beautiful Lemaire Channel of Anvers Island, Antarctica and gives you a feel of what it looks like looking down off the bow of the boat while cutting some thin sea ice. Near the end of the movie, you can see the "bulbous bow" feature of the boat underneath the surface of the water. This protrusion off the boat's bow…

Anvers Island

Anvers Island

pin 1
Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search