"The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was the first federation of labor unions in the United States. It was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in May 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers of the Cigar Makers' International Union was elected president of the Federation at its founding convention and was reelected every year except one until his death in 1924" ~~AFL-label.jpg

"The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was the first federation of labor unions in the United States. It was founded in Columbus, Ohio, in May 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers of the Cigar Makers' International Union was elected president of the Federation at its founding convention and was reelected every year except one until his death in 1924" ~~AFL-label.jpg

The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, organized in 1925, was America’s first African American Labor Union to receive a charter in the American Federation of Labor. The Brotherhood was formed when a small group of porters went to A. Philip Randolph and sought his help in the creation of a union of porters.

The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, organized in 1925, was America’s first African American Labor Union to receive a charter in the American Federation of Labor. The Brotherhood was formed when a small group of porters went to A. Philip Randolph and sought his help in the creation of a union of porters.

Vintage Union pins, Labor Union pins, AFL Engineers set pins, American Federation of Labor by bullseyecollectibles on Etsy

Vintage Union pins, Labor Union pins, AFL Engineers set pins, American Federation of Labor

Vintage Union pins, Labor Union pins, AFL Engineers set pins, American Federation of Labor by bullseyecollectibles on Etsy

June 11, 1969:  Labor leader John L. Lewis dies.  Born in Cleveland, IA, in 1880 to Welsh immigrant parents, Lewis went to work as a miner when he was a teenager.  He worked as a mine workers’ organizer for the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and went on to serve the president of the United Mine Workers of America for 40 years.  A firm believer in industrial unionism, Lewis formed the predecessor organization to what would become the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO).

June 11, 1969

June 11, 1969: Labor leader John L. Lewis dies. Born in Cleveland, IA, in 1880 to Welsh immigrant parents, Lewis went to work as a miner when he was a teenager. He worked as a mine workers’ organizer for the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and went on to serve the president of the United Mine Workers of America for 40 years. A firm believer in industrial unionism, Lewis formed the predecessor organization to what would become the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO).

Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters : The First Black Labor Union Chartered By The American Federation Of Labor

Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters : The First Black Labor Union Chartered By The American Federation Of Labor

Irving Brown (1911 – 1989) was an American trades-unionist, member of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and then of the AFL-CIO, who played an important role in Western Europe and in Africa, during the Cold War, in supporting splits among trade-unions in order to counter Communist influence. While he was a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agent, he founded in 1962 the American Institute for Free Labor Development.

Irving Brown (1911 – 1989) was an American trades-unionist, member of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and then of the AFL-CIO, who played an important role in Western Europe and in Africa, during the Cold War, in supporting splits among trade-unions in order to counter Communist influence. While he was a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agent, he founded in 1962 the American Institute for Free Labor Development.

Cover of American Federation of Labor organizing leaflet which explained to workers their right to organize into unions of their choice, guaranteed by the National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act) of 1935.

Cover of American Federation of Labor organizing leaflet which explained to workers their right to organize into unions of their choice, guaranteed by the National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act) of 1935.

American Federation of Teachers: After longtime AFT President Albert Shanker died in in 1997, he was succeeded by Sandra Feldman, who slowly “re-branded” the union, allying it with some of the most powerful left-wing elements of the New Labor Movement. When Feldman died in 2004, Edward McElroy took her place, followed by Randi Weingarten in 2008. All of them kept the union on the leftward course it had adopted in its post-Shanker period.

American Federation of Teachers: After longtime AFT President Albert Shanker died in in 1997, he was succeeded by Sandra Feldman, who slowly “re-branded” the union, allying it with some of the most powerful left-wing elements of the New Labor Movement. When Feldman died in 2004, Edward McElroy took her place, followed by Randi Weingarten in 2008. All of them kept the union on the leftward course it had adopted in its post-Shanker period.

The merger of AFL and CIO. The Taft-Hartley Act and similar anti-union legislation of the late-1940s were designed to slow labor’s growth, but by 1955, the proportion of the workplace organized into unions nevertheless hit its historic high of over 30 percent. To build on labor’s forward momentum, the Congress of Industrial Organizations merged with the American Federation of Labor to create the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of organized labor in the US.

The merger of AFL and CIO. The Taft-Hartley Act and similar anti-union legislation of the late-1940s were designed to slow labor’s growth, but by 1955, the proportion of the workplace organized into unions nevertheless hit its historic high of over 30 percent. To build on labor’s forward momentum, the Congress of Industrial Organizations merged with the American Federation of Labor to create the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of organized labor in the US.

May 1, 1886:  At its 1884 convention, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions (which became the American Federation of Labor), proclaims that “eight hours shall constitute a legal day’s labor from and after May 1, 1886.”  The resolution received overwhelming support from FOTLU’s affiliated unions, which organized mass demonstrations and strikes in cities across the country.

May 1, 1886

May 1, 1886: At its 1884 convention, the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions (which became the American Federation of Labor), proclaims that “eight hours shall constitute a legal day’s labor from and after May 1, 1886.” The resolution received overwhelming support from FOTLU’s affiliated unions, which organized mass demonstrations and strikes in cities across the country.

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