The Acorn Archimedes was Acorn Computers Ltd's first general purpose home computer to be based on their own ARM architecture. Using a RISC design with a 32-bit CPU, at its launch in June 1987, the Archimedes was stated as running at 4 MIPS, with a claim of 18 MIPS during tests.

The Acorn Archimedes was Acorn Computers Ltd's first general purpose home computer to be based on their own ARM architecture. Using a RISC design with a 32-bit CPU, at its launch in June 1987, the Archimedes was stated as running at 4 MIPS, with a claim of 18 MIPS during tests.

he Acorn BBC model A was the successor of the Acorn Atom and its first name was Acorn Proton. It was a very popular computer in the UK and was widely used in schools,

he Acorn BBC model A was the successor of the Acorn Atom and its first name was Acorn Proton. It was a very popular computer in the UK and was widely used in schools,

Acorn Computer  ATOM  	    The Acorn Atom was the ancestor of the BBC computers series. It was sold in kit or ready-assembled versions.    The great advantage of the Atom compared to its competitors (TRS-80 & PET), was its high resolution capabilities (256 x 192) which were quite unusual in 1979 for the price.

Acorn Computer ATOM The Acorn Atom was the ancestor of the BBC computers series. It was sold in kit or ready-assembled versions. The great advantage of the Atom compared to its competitors (TRS-80 & PET), was its high resolution capabilities (256 x 192) which were quite unusual in 1979 for the price.

The Acorn ABC 210 / Cambridge Workstation was the only model from the announced, marketed but unreleased ABC (Acorn Business Computer) line, first claimed to be available in October 1984. The ABCs were a range of machines using an integrated monitor, disk drive, PSU and BBC B+ 64K motherboard with slight modifications, originally featuring CPUs from straight 6502 terminals to an 80286 based system.

The Acorn ABC 210 / Cambridge Workstation was the only model from the announced, marketed but unreleased ABC (Acorn Business Computer) line, first claimed to be available in October 1984. The ABCs were a range of machines using an integrated monitor, disk drive, PSU and BBC B+ 64K motherboard with slight modifications, originally featuring CPUs from straight 6502 terminals to an 80286 based system.

Acorn computer http://flashbackgames.co.uk/shop/Item.asp?Title=Acorn_Electron_Computer_Unboxed=1181

Acorn computer http://flashbackgames.co.uk/shop/Item.asp?Title=Acorn_Electron_Computer_Unboxed=1181

Acorn System 1. This 6502 modular system was the first computer produced by Acorn in 1979. It was basically the same type of computer as competitors offered at that time (KIM-1, MK14, Nascom, etc...) : a 6502 or Z80 CPU (in this case, a 6502) mounted on a simple "naked" board, with a one-line display and a hexadecimal keyboard.

Acorn System 1. This 6502 modular system was the first computer produced by Acorn in 1979. It was basically the same type of computer as competitors offered at that time (KIM-1, MK14, Nascom, etc...) : a 6502 or Z80 CPU (in this case, a 6502) mounted on a simple "naked" board, with a one-line display and a hexadecimal keyboard.

A Million Kids in the #UK Will Get This Tiny #Computer - The BBC Micro, made by Acorn Computers, was a beige box that looked a lot like a typewriter and taught children how to code. Like the Commodore 64, the Micro ushered in a wave of computer literacy among kids who came of age in the 1980s

A Million Kids in the #UK Will Get This Tiny #Computer - The BBC Micro, made by Acorn Computers, was a beige box that looked a lot like a typewriter and taught children how to code. Like the Commodore 64, the Micro ushered in a wave of computer literacy among kids who came of age in the 1980s

Sophie Wilson FRS is a British computer scientist. She is known for designing the Acorn Micro-Computer, the first of a long line of computers sold by Acorn Computers Ltd, as well as the instruction set of the ARM processor. Wilson now works at semiconductor giant Broadcom, working on a processor line she also created - FirePath, a DSL chip that has also had a major impact.

Sophie Wilson FRS is a British computer scientist. She is known for designing the Acorn Micro-Computer, the first of a long line of computers sold by Acorn Computers Ltd, as well as the instruction set of the ARM processor. Wilson now works at semiconductor giant Broadcom, working on a processor line she also created - FirePath, a DSL chip that has also had a major impact.

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