New Zealand new earthquake fault ‘similar to Alpine’ fault | The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond

New Zealand new earthquake fault ‘similar to Alpine’ fault

New Zealand new earthquake fault ‘similar to Alpine’ fault | The Extinction Protocol: 2012 and beyond

The world's fastest moving fault lies beneath New Zealand, and has taken a dramatic U-turn over the last 65 million years, new research suggests.The Alpine Fault, part of the fault zone at the point where the Pacific Plate is diving beneath the Australian Plate, has shifted the two corners of New Zealand's South Island relative to each other a whopping 435 miles (700 kilometers) over the last 25 million years.That shift translates to a maximum speed of about 1.85 inches (4.7 centimeters) of…

World's Fastest Moving Fault Took a U-Turn Eons Ago

The world's fastest moving fault lies beneath New Zealand, and has taken a dramatic U-turn over the last 65 million years, new research suggests.The Alpine Fault, part of the fault zone at the point where the Pacific Plate is diving beneath the Australian Plate, has shifted the two corners of New Zealand's South Island relative to each other a whopping 435 miles (700 kilometers) over the last 25 million years.That shift translates to a maximum speed of about 1.85 inches (4.7 centimeters) of…

The Alpine Fault on New Zealand’s South Island is clearly visible from the air. This fault, which is similar to California’s San Andreas Fault is capable of producing large magnitude earthquakes. (Photo from New Zealand Geographic)

The Alpine Fault on New Zealand’s South Island is clearly visible from the air. This fault, which is similar to California’s San Andreas Fault is capable of producing large magnitude earthquakes. (Photo from New Zealand Geographic)

An exposure of the Alpine Fault at Gaunt Creek, South Island, New Zealand. Credit: Hiroshi Sato. The most distinctive rock unit in the fault zone is a gouge--a pulverized, claylike mixture (clay minerals, white mica and smectite) formed along the principal zone of slip.

An exposure of the Alpine Fault at Gaunt Creek, South Island, New Zealand. Credit: Hiroshi Sato. The most distinctive rock unit in the fault zone is a gouge--a pulverized, claylike mixture (clay minerals, white mica and smectite) formed along the principal zone of slip.

Queenstown conference told of potential impact of alpine fault rupture - Stuff.co.nz

Queenstown conference told of potential impact of alpine fault rupture - Stuff.co.nz

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