Japanese traditional straw raincoat for snowy regions - Mino 蓑

Japanese traditional straw raincoat for snowy regions - Mino 蓑

traditional reed capes used to protect from the rain. In the photos, Duarte is wearing only the cape, without the redd hat or leggings. Very shortly, the reed is braided in transversal lines from which both internal and external layers will be created. On the inside, the reed will form a continuous lining. On the outside the reed will be cut and layed in layers to assure the cape’s

traditional reed capes used to protect from the rain. In the photos, Duarte is wearing only the cape, without the redd hat or leggings. Very shortly, the reed is braided in transversal lines from which both internal and external layers will be created. On the inside, the reed will form a continuous lining. On the outside the reed will be cut and layed in layers to assure the cape’s

* Cape de pluie " mino " - Akita préfecture - période Edo/Meiji - Japon - XIXème siècle Herbe - coton - fibres végétales dont certaines teintes à l'indigo Vêtement traditionnel japonais imperméable dont la partie supérieure en fibres bicolores est travaillée en damier

* Cape de pluie " mino " - Akita préfecture - période Edo/Meiji - Japon - XIXème siècle Herbe - coton - fibres végétales dont certaines teintes à l'indigo Vêtement traditionnel japonais imperméable dont la partie supérieure en fibres bicolores est travaillée en damier

'Matariki' by Veranoa Hetet. A reversible cloak made entirely of flax (unprocessed, piupiu and fibre). The top woven panel has the Matariki pattern on one side and Waahi rua on the reverse. Both patterns represent those who have passed on. When wearing this cloak one is embraced by them. The piupiu at the bottom gives weight to the cloak and represents the gifts handed down by our ancestors - anchoring Māori in tradition.

'Matariki' by Veranoa Hetet. A reversible cloak made entirely of flax (unprocessed, piupiu and fibre). The top woven panel has the Matariki pattern on one side and Waahi rua on the reverse. Both patterns represent those who have passed on. When wearing this cloak one is embraced by them. The piupiu at the bottom gives weight to the cloak and represents the gifts handed down by our ancestors - anchoring Māori in tradition.

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