MAORI: wood carved sculpture ( New Zealand) Maori wood carving (whakairo rakau) is probably the most renowned and well known type of Maori art. Meeting houses, war canoes (waka) but also smaller items such as weapons, sacred boxes and small statues were ornamented with wood carvings. This carving clearly displays the tribal traditions of body decoration- tatooes.

MAORI: wood carved sculpture ( New Zealand) Maori wood carving (whakairo rakau) is probably the most renowned and well known type of Maori art. Meeting houses, war canoes (waka) but also smaller items such as weapons, sacred boxes and small statues were ornamented with wood carvings. This carving clearly displays the tribal traditions of body decoration- tatooes.

Koroua • Wise Old Man by Todd Couper, Māori artist (KC120602)

Koroua • Wise Old Man by Todd Couper, Māori artist (KC120602)

I'd like to make the fishing exhibit more artistic and engaging. I think that maori art and stuff along these lines is interesting from a tourists point of view and it's different than what they might expect from another museum "kotuku_wairua - Shane Hansen"

I'd like to make the fishing exhibit more artistic and engaging. I think that maori art and stuff along these lines is interesting from a tourists point of view and it's different than what they might expect from another museum "kotuku_wairua - Shane Hansen"

Te Whiti o Tu - Maori Legend - Read the story here - http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/artwork/12076/rehutai-and-tangimoana

Te Whiti o Tu - Maori Legend - Read the story here - http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/artwork/12076/rehutai-and-tangimoana

MAORI CREATION STORY: Indigenous artist, Marcus Winter, tells the Māori creation story using Sand Art. In the Māori worldview, the world began with the violent separation of Ranginui, the Sky Father, and Papatuanuku, the Earth Mother, by their children, including Tūmatauenga (similar to Kū), Tāne (Kāne), Rongo (Lono, god of cultivated food), and Tangaroa (Kanaloa, the god of the sea).

MAORI CREATION STORY: Indigenous artist, Marcus Winter, tells the Māori creation story using Sand Art. In the Māori worldview, the world began with the violent separation of Ranginui, the Sky Father, and Papatuanuku, the Earth Mother, by their children, including Tūmatauenga (similar to Kū), Tāne (Kāne), Rongo (Lono, god of cultivated food), and Tangaroa (Kanaloa, the god of the sea).

In Maori traditions(AotearoaNZ) Hine-tītama was the daughter of the god Tāne(Forest realm) and Hineahuone(the first woman), formed by Tāne from the earth. Hine-tītama later fled to the underworld and became Hine-nui-te-pō, the goddess of death.

In Maori traditions(AotearoaNZ) Hine-tītama was the daughter of the god Tāne(Forest realm) and Hineahuone(the first woman), formed by Tāne from the earth. Hine-tītama later fled to the underworld and became Hine-nui-te-pō, the goddess of death.


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"HINE-NUI-TE-PŌ (via poppies-for-ophelia on tumblr) The Maori Goddess of Night, Darkness, Death and the Ruler of the Underworld"

"HINE-NUI-TE-PŌ (via poppies-for-ophelia on tumblr) The Maori Goddess of Night, Darkness, Death and the Ruler of the Underworld"

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

In Maori traditions(Aotearoa) Taranga, the mother of Māui, stands over her newborn son, who floats on the ocean. Above her the baby lies on his mother's hair. When he was stillborn she set him into the sea wrapped in her tikitiki, a topknot of hair. Māui became known as Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. On one side of Taranga Māui, as a kererū, looks down on his father, and on her other side are Māui's brothers. In this tradition, Māui washed ashore and was raised by his grandfather.

The tradition originated from the story of the birth of the first earthly Maori woman, Hineahuone, who was made from clay until the Maori god Tāne breathed life into her nostrils. Now, the greeting means "to share breath." By doing so, it is acknowledged that the visitor becomes a member of the local people.

The tradition originated from the story of the birth of the first earthly Maori woman, Hineahuone, who was made from clay until the Maori god Tāne breathed life into her nostrils. Now, the greeting means "to share breath." By doing so, it is acknowledged that the visitor becomes a member of the local people.

illustrations 2011 by Florian NICOLLE, via Behance

Illustrations Series 2011 by Florian NICOLLE

Brad Novak NZ - MIXED MEDIA - Sir Ed 1.2 (after Karsh)

Brad Novak NZ - MIXED MEDIA - Sir Ed 1.2 (after Karsh)

Robin Slow Kura Gallery Maori Art Design New Zealand Painting Kokowai Gold Leaf Canvas Tohora 5

Robin Slow Kura Gallery Maori Art Design New Zealand Painting Kokowai Gold Leaf Canvas Tohora 5

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