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GEOLOGIA

GEOLOGIA

Quetzalcoatlus northropi is an azhdarchid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl

Quetzalcoatlus northropi is an azhdarchid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl

pterodactyl skull - Google Search

pterodactyl skull - Google Search

paleoillustration: “Ceratopsians by Camila Alli Chair ”

paleoillustration: “Ceratopsians by Camila Alli Chair ”

the James and Louise Temerty Galleries of the Age of Dinosaurs of the Royal Ontario Museum.   Adult skull and jaws of Corythosaurus casuarius Lambeosaurine hadrosaur Ornithischian Dinosaur Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta Late Cretaceous 76 million years old.

the James and Louise Temerty Galleries of the Age of Dinosaurs of the Royal Ontario Museum. Adult skull and jaws of Corythosaurus casuarius Lambeosaurine hadrosaur Ornithischian Dinosaur Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta Late Cretaceous 76 million years old.

Picasso

Picasso

Dimorphodon mount.jpg

Dimorphodon mount.jpg

Three views of Diplodocus skull. SMM. © Mark Ryan

Three views of Diplodocus skull. SMM. © Mark Ryan

Museum worker holds Head of a Diplodocus Skeleton

Museum worker holds Head of a Diplodocus Skeleton

The Late Permian seen here 260 million years ago was the Age of Reptiles. The…

The Late Permian seen here 260 million years ago was the Age of Reptiles. The…