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St Cuthbert. 12th cent wall-painting in Durham Cathedral.  St Cuthbert (c.634–687). Anglo-Saxon monk of the Early English Church. Usually linked to the monasteries of Melrose and Lindisfarne, where he was made prior (c665) and, later on, in 684, bishop of Lindisfarne. His cult centred on his tomb at Durham cathedral and was one of the most famous saints in England in the middle Ages

St Cuthbert. 12th cent wall-painting in Durham Cathedral. St Cuthbert (c.634–687). Anglo-Saxon monk of the Early English Church. Usually linked to the monasteries of Melrose and Lindisfarne, where he was made prior (c665) and, later on, in 684, bishop of Lindisfarne. His cult centred on his tomb at Durham cathedral and was one of the most famous saints in England in the middle Ages

Aidan of Lindisfarne. (died 31 August 651), known as the Apostle of Northumbria, was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, served as its first bishop.

Aidan of Lindisfarne. (died 31 August 651), known as the Apostle of Northumbria, was an Irish monk and missionary credited with restoring Christianity to Northumbria. He founded a monastic cathedral on the island of Lindisfarne, served as its first bishop.

Extremely rare gold saxon ring with a flat circular bezel engraved with a champlevé zoomorphic pattern inlaid with black niello, displaying a fantastic beast, the sinuous body shown in profile with only two legs visible, Y-shaped paws, turned-back head, biting it's own tail. The hoop is formed by a single wire twisted like a torque, a typical early saxon design, the shoulders terminating in foliate motifs. England, Northumbria (?), probably late 9th century

Extremely rare gold saxon ring with a flat circular bezel engraved with a champlevé zoomorphic pattern inlaid with black niello, displaying a fantastic beast, the sinuous body shown in profile with only two legs visible, Y-shaped paws, turned-back head, biting it's own tail. The hoop is formed by a single wire twisted like a torque, a typical early saxon design, the shoulders terminating in foliate motifs. England, Northumbria (?), probably late 9th century

Anglo-Saxon. Great Britain, kingdom of Northumbria. Archbishop Wigmund, 837-854 AD. Bronze Styca, struck by moneyer AEthelhelm.

Anglo-Saxon. Great Britain, kingdom of Northumbria. Archbishop Wigmund, 837-854 AD. Bronze Styca, struck by moneyer AEthelhelm.

(St.) Aethelburh of Kent/Ethelburga was the daughter of King Aethelred and his wife, Bertha. In 625, Aethelburh married King Edwin of Northumbria, a pagan, whom she eventually converted. Aethelburh, along with her mother Bertha, was praised by the Venerable Bede for converting their husbands. After her husband's death, Aethelburh founded one of the first Benedictine nunneries in England at Lyminge. She became it's abbess and taught medicine and healed the sick.

(St.) Aethelburh of Kent/Ethelburga was the daughter of King Aethelred and his wife, Bertha. In 625, Aethelburh married King Edwin of Northumbria, a pagan, whom she eventually converted. Aethelburh, along with her mother Bertha, was praised by the Venerable Bede for converting their husbands. After her husband's death, Aethelburh founded one of the first Benedictine nunneries in England at Lyminge. She became it's abbess and taught medicine and healed the sick.

Eric Bloodaxe Norse king of York 952 954 - Kingdom of Northumbria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eric Bloodaxe Norse king of York 952 954 - Kingdom of Northumbria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia