Te Hau-Ki-Turanga meeting house, built by the Ngati Kaipoho tribe in 1842

Te Hau-Ki-Turanga meeting house, built by the Ngati Kaipoho tribe in 1842

Te Hau-Ki-Turanga meeting house, built by the Ngati Kaipoho tribe in 1842

Te Hau-Ki-Turanga meeting house, built by the Ngati Kaipoho tribe in 1842

Wī Pere: Wī Pere was a politician from Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki and Rongowhakaata tribes. He criticised the practice of forcing Māori into towns for hearings, noting that in one example, ‘The expenses were so great that the value of the land was absorbed in the outlay incurred in attending the sittings of the Court.

Wī Pere: Wī Pere was a politician from Te Aitanga-a-Māhaki and Rongowhakaata tribes. He criticised the practice of forcing Māori into towns for hearings, noting that in one example, ‘The expenses were so great that the value of the land was absorbed in the outlay incurred in attending the sittings of the Court.

Wiremu Pere, photographed between 1884 and 1887

Wiremu Pere, photographed between 1884 and 1887

Wyllie Cottage - The first European house to be built East of the Taruheru River is the oldest house still standing in Gisborne.

Wyllie Cottage - The first European house to be built East of the Taruheru River is the oldest house still standing in Gisborne.

Wiremu Pere: The Life and Times of a Maori Leader, 1837-1915 - Joseph Anaru Te Kani Pere - Google Books - Photo contains Kate Gannon and Wi Pere

Wiremu Pere: The Life and Times of a Maori Leader, 1837-1915 - Joseph Anaru Te Kani Pere - Google Books - Photo contains Kate Gannon and Wi Pere

Beattie's Book Blog - : Wiremu Pere Memorial in Gisborne

Beattie's Book Blog - : Wiremu Pere Memorial in Gisborne

Formidable land claimant Kate Wyllie (sister of Wi Pere)

Formidable land claimant Kate Wyllie (sister of Wi Pere)

Kate Wyllie with her half-brother, Wi Pere

Kate Wyllie with her half-brother, Wi Pere

Standing Ancestor Figure New Zealand, Maori culture, possibly Rongowhakaata people Te Huringa period c. 1800–1840

Standing Ancestor Figure New Zealand, Maori culture, possibly Rongowhakaata people Te Huringa period c. 1800–1840

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