The English Peerage

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two women standing next to each other in front of a building
Royal queen, Her majesty the queen, History queen
Mother Theresa and Queen Elizabeth II:
an old photo of a woman and her dog
British Royal Photos
Queen Victoria with her dog, Sharp, c1866-67.
a statue of a man holding a woman in his arms
Weeper of Thomas Beauchamp and wife Katherine Mortimer, 1369, Weeper 28
an ornately decorated bench in the middle of a room with stone floors and walls
Queen Katherine Parr - Henry VIII's 6th Queen outlived him only to die of puerperal fever shortly after the birth of her daughter Mary
the entrance to prince henry's palace in london, england with his name on it
1st January 1511: In the early hours of the morning Catherine of Aragon gave birth to a son, Henry Duke of Cornwall, son of Henry VIII. Tragically the little boy was to die only fifty two days later on February 22nd. How different Tudor history and England may have been if the little boy had lived.
a fire burning in a fireplace inside of a building
Henry VIII’s kitchen complex contained 50 rooms, including larders for fish, meat and grain, and areas for boiling, pastry making and making confectionary. The kitchens provided food for the courtiers and staff, Henry had his own private kitchens near his own suite of rooms.
an animal statue is laying down on the ground with its head resting on it's back
Richard III's son rests in Sheriff Hutton
Edward of Middleham, the only legitimate son of King Richard III, is thought to be buried in a small parish church in Sheriff Hutton
a statue of a woman with a hat and cane
John Beauchamp of Holt, 1388, and wife Joan Worcester
Knight was a term used to refer to a nobleman or warrior, but its root English word was cniht, which meant page boy. The ideas of knighthood are more closely related to the Roman equites. Equites is a Latin word meaning horsemen. The equites were made of Romans wealthy enough to afford horses. Knights in the early middle ages were just horsemen, but it became a sign of nobility and social status as it grew more expensive to get equipped for fighting on horseback.
Knighthood
Knight was a term used to refer to a nobleman or warrior, but its root English word was cniht, which meant page boy. The ideas of knighthood are more closely related to the Roman equites. Equites is a Latin word meaning horsemen. The equites were made of Romans wealthy enough to afford horses. Knights in the early middle ages were just horsemen, but it became a sign of nobility and social status as it grew more expensive to get equipped for fighting on horseback.
an elaborately carved cathedral with statues in it
Edward II
Edward II's tomb at Gloucester Cathedral.
several people in small boats going into a tunnel
The Sapperton Tunnel in Gloucestershire, England
an aerial view of a castle in the water
Castles & Manor Houses
Bodiam Castle, East Sussex, England. http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/photos.htm Bodiam Castle is a 14th-century moated castle. It was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, to...
an old wooden bench with iron work on it
Tomb of Richard II and Anne, Westminster Abbey
a statue of a man holding a baseball bat in his right hand and pointing to the sky
King Richard III statue, Castle Gardens, Leicester
Statue of Richard III, last Plantagenet king of England. Much maligned by the victorious Tudors, Shakespeare wrote him as crook-backed and treacherous, though no extant records record such a thing. He is also infamously supposed to have ordered the death of his nephews, thereby leaving his path to the throne clear after his brother, Edward's death. As of September '12 a dig is in progress in Leicester, to attempt to find his grave.