The pohutukawa tree (Metrosideros excelsa) with its crimson flower has become an established part of the New Zealand Christmas tradition. This iconic Kiwi Christmas tree, which often features on greeting cards and in poems and songs, has become an important symbol for New Zealanders at home and abroad.

The pohutukawa tree (Metrosideros excelsa) with its crimson flower has become an established part of the New Zealand Christmas tradition. This iconic Kiwi Christmas tree, which often features on greeting cards and in poems and songs, has become an important symbol for New Zealanders at home and abroad.

Yummy macadamias

Yummy macadamias

New Zealand's Summer Christmas Tree - The Pohutukawa

New Zealand's Summer Christmas Tree - The Pohutukawa

The Pōhutukawa tree flowers from November to January with a peak in mid to late December (which is summer in the southern hemisphere), with brilliant crimson flowers covering the tree, hence the nickname New Zealand Christmas Tree.

The Pōhutukawa tree flowers from November to January with a peak in mid to late December (which is summer in the southern hemisphere), with brilliant crimson flowers covering the tree, hence the nickname New Zealand Christmas Tree.

Renowned for its vibrant colour and its ability to survive even perched on rocky, precarious cliffs, it has found an important place in New Zealand culture for its strength and beauty and is regarded as a "chiefly tree" by Māori.

Renowned for its vibrant colour and its ability to survive even perched on rocky, precarious cliffs, it has found an important place in New Zealand culture for its strength and beauty and is regarded as a "chiefly tree" by Māori.

The Pōhutukawa - regarded as a chiefly tree (rākau rangatira) by Māori- is a coastal evergreen tree that produces a brilliant display of red flowers made up of a mass of stamens. It is one of twelve Metrosideros species endemic to New Zealand.

The Pōhutukawa - regarded as a chiefly tree (rākau rangatira) by Māori- is a coastal evergreen tree that produces a brilliant display of red flowers made up of a mass of stamens. It is one of twelve Metrosideros species endemic to New Zealand.

Red and silver beech trees fill the Maruia valley in the northern South Island. The largest trunks belong to red beeches, which reach a height of 30 metres. The forest interior is quite open, with beech saplings growing below gaps in the canopy.

Red and silver beech trees fill the Maruia valley in the northern South Island. The largest trunks belong to red beeches, which reach a height of 30 metres. The forest interior is quite open, with beech saplings growing below gaps in the canopy.

Extensive mountain–silver beech forest is found in Fiordland National Park. Rimu, miro and kahikatea are sometimes also present, and can be seen here emerging above the beech canopy.

Extensive mountain–silver beech forest is found in Fiordland National Park. Rimu, miro and kahikatea are sometimes also present, and can be seen here emerging above the beech canopy.

The male flowers of mountain beech bloom in spring, just as leaf buds burst to reveal the new season’s leaves. The simple flower has five light-green petals and 8–14 dark red anthers, full of pollen. The female flower is minute, and blooms after the male flower has shed its pollen.

The male flowers of mountain beech bloom in spring, just as leaf buds burst to reveal the new season’s leaves. The simple flower has five light-green petals and 8–14 dark red anthers, full of pollen. The female flower is minute, and blooms after the male flower has shed its pollen.

Pinterest
Search