Maori Cloak: #Kahu kuri; #korowai; #Kaitaka; #Kahu huruhuru; #Korowai; #Kahu toi; #Pake; Kahu koati

#maori; #Kahu kuri; #korowai; #cloak; #Kaitaka; #Kahu huruhuru; #Korowai; #Kahu toi; #Pake; Kahu koati; #art; #history; #new zealand; #newzealand; #nz; #aotearoa; #tribe
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Topic: Korowai style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Korowai style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Korowai style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa: Korowai are fine flax cloaks decorated with tassels. Find out how this elegant style developed from the functional rain cape, and be introduced to a few key forms.

Topic: Korowai style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa: Korowai are fine flax cloaks decorated with tassels. Find out how this elegant style developed from the functional rain cape, and be introduced to a few key forms.

Kahu tōī are prestigious warrior capes of leaf fibre from the hardy tōī (mountain cabbage tree).  of great prestige - not everyday working garments as their heavy, shaggy appearance suggests. The only form of pākē (rain cape) to carry the title ‘kahu’, for important garments alone. The high status of kahu tōī is connected to their strength & difficult construction, fibre much tougher & more water-resistant than muka (the flax fibre typically used), constructing a kahu tōī requires great…

Kahu tōī are prestigious warrior capes of leaf fibre from the hardy tōī (mountain cabbage tree). of great prestige - not everyday working garments as their heavy, shaggy appearance suggests. The only form of pākē (rain cape) to carry the title ‘kahu’, for important garments alone. The high status of kahu tōī is connected to their strength & difficult construction, fibre much tougher & more water-resistant than muka (the flax fibre typically used), constructing a kahu tōī requires great…

Pake: Maori developed to survive New Zealand’s cold climate - pake, or rain capes. Surviving New Zealand’s climate: After arriving in Aotearoa NZ, Maori needed clothing to protect themselves from the cold, as shelter when travelling & sleeping outside.  They developed pake (rain capes) - practical, everyday garments made by attaching hundreds of leaf strips, called hukahuka, to a woven foundation. The hukahuka channelled off the rain.

Pake: Maori developed to survive New Zealand’s cold climate - pake, or rain capes. Surviving New Zealand’s climate: After arriving in Aotearoa NZ, Maori needed clothing to protect themselves from the cold, as shelter when travelling & sleeping outside. They developed pake (rain capes) - practical, everyday garments made by attaching hundreds of leaf strips, called hukahuka, to a woven foundation. The hukahuka channelled off the rain.

Whakatipu (type of rain cape)

Whakatipu (type of rain cape)

Topic: Pake style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Pake style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Kahu koati style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Topic: Kahu koati style of cloak | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Kahu koati (goat-hair cloaks) exemplify how innovative Māori weavers adopted new European materials for their own purposes. When the prized kurī (Pacific dog) became extinct in the mid to late 1800s, Māori weavers could no longer make prestigious kahu kurī (dog-skin cloaks). But discovered recreate the luxurious look of these cloaks with mohair from angora goats, which were introduced to New Zealand in 1867, sometimes also hair from wild goats, brought by British explorer James Cook in 1773.

Kahu koati (goat-hair cloaks) exemplify how innovative Māori weavers adopted new European materials for their own purposes. When the prized kurī (Pacific dog) became extinct in the mid to late 1800s, Māori weavers could no longer make prestigious kahu kurī (dog-skin cloaks). But discovered recreate the luxurious look of these cloaks with mohair from angora goats, which were introduced to New Zealand in 1867, sometimes also hair from wild goats, brought by British explorer James Cook in 1773.

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