Anton Skerlj-rovers

Anton Skerlj-rovers

Anton Skerlj-rovers
More ideas from Anton
Located in Brazil, Anhumas Abyss is an underwater cave that is accessible by rappelling down roughly 235 feet through a large gap in the rocks.

Located in Brazil, Anhumas Abyss is an underwater cave that is accessible by rappelling down roughly 235 feet through a large gap in the rocks.

Sotano de las Golondrinas, Cavers explore a cavern so deep clouds form inside photo by Dave Bunnell

Sotano de las Golondrinas, Cavers explore a cavern so deep clouds form inside photo by Dave Bunnell

4. The job market still faces a gaping hole: From the job market's peak in early 2008 to its bottom in 2010, the U.S. economy lost 8.7 million jobs -- about half of which were in construction and manufacturing. To this day, the United States still hasn't gained back all those jobs. To fill that abyss, the economy still needs about 7.9 million jobs to get back to pre-recession conditions...

4. The job market still faces a gaping hole: From the job market's peak in early 2008 to its bottom in 2010, the U.S. economy lost 8.7 million jobs -- about half of which were in construction and manufacturing. To this day, the United States still hasn't gained back all those jobs. To fill that abyss, the economy still needs about 7.9 million jobs to get back to pre-recession conditions...

Underwater caves by Anatoly Beloshchin ~ well I wouldn't actually want to go there... I would probably drown.

Underwater caves by Anatoly Beloshchin ~ well I wouldn't actually want to go there... I would probably drown.

Cave Diving in Tulum, Mexico Photograph by Patrik Gustafsson, National Geographic Your Shot  A diver explores a cenote in Tulum, Mexico. Ancient Maya believed that the rain god Chaak lived in these natural wells. Now they are giving archaeologists new insights into the sacred landscapes of the ancestral people.

Cave Diving in Tulum, Mexico Photograph by Patrik Gustafsson, National Geographic Your Shot A diver explores a cenote in Tulum, Mexico. Ancient Maya believed that the rain god Chaak lived in these natural wells. Now they are giving archaeologists new insights into the sacred landscapes of the ancestral people.