The Meaning of Liff - The book is a "dictionary of things that there aren't any words for yet".[2] Rather than inventing new words, Adams and Lloyd picked a number of existing place-names and assigned interesting meanings to them,[3] meanings that can be regarded as on the verge of social existence and are ready to become recognisable entities.[4]  All the words listed are toponyms and describe common feelings and objects for which there is no current English word. Examples are Shoeburyness…

The Meaning of Liff - The book is a "dictionary of things that there aren't any words for yet".[2] Rather than inventing new words, Adams and Lloyd picked a number of existing place-names and assigned interesting meanings to them,[3] meanings that can be regarded as on the verge of social existence and are ready to become recognisable entities.[4] All the words listed are toponyms and describe common feelings and objects for which there is no current English word. Examples are Shoeburyness…

ABILENE (adj.) Descriptive of the pleasing coolness on the reverse side of the pillow.

ABILENE (adj.) Descriptive of the pleasing coolness on the reverse side of the pillow.

SHOEBURYNESS (abs.n.) The vague uncomfortable feeling you get when sitting on a seat which is still warm from somebody else's bottom.

SHOEBURYNESS (abs.n.) The vague uncomfortable feeling you get when sitting on a seat which is still warm from somebody else's bottom.

BOSCASTLE (n.) The huge pyramid of tin cans placed just inside the entrance to a supermarket.

BOSCASTLE (n.) The huge pyramid of tin cans placed just inside the entrance to a supermarket.

Fring (n.) The noise made by a lightbulb that has just shone its last.

Fring (n.) The noise made by a lightbulb that has just shone its last.

THE MEANING OF LIFF - Humour of Douglas Adams: GLOADBY MARWOOD (n.) Someone who stops Jon Cleese on the street and demands that he does a funny walk.

THE MEANING OF LIFF - Humour of Douglas Adams: GLOADBY MARWOOD (n.) Someone who stops Jon Cleese on the street and demands that he does a funny walk.

TINGRITH (n.) The feeling of silver paper against your fillings.

TINGRITH (n.) The feeling of silver paper against your fillings.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of The Meaning of Liff, by John Lloyd and Douglas Adams. This funny and well-loved dictionary uses placenames as new definitions for common experiences which we all know and recognize, but for which no words exist.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of The Meaning of Liff, by John Lloyd and Douglas Adams. This funny and well-loved dictionary uses placenames as new definitions for common experiences which we all know and recognize, but for which no words exist.

Unseen Hitchhiker's Guide material in new Douglas Adams biography

Unseen Hitchhiker's Guide material in new Douglas Adams biography

Douglas Adams made me a writer: Neil Gaiman salutes his friend and inspiration. Paying tribute to his genius at the annual Douglas Adams lecture, writer explains how meeting the Hitchhiker’s Guide author at 22 changed his life

Lost poems of Douglas Adams and Griff Rhys Jones found in school cupboard

Lost poems of Douglas Adams and Griff Rhys Jones found in school cupboard

Brentwood school uncovers works penned by teenage schoolmates in its sixth-form literary society, writes Alison Flood

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