Hinenuitepo - Goddess of the Night ///    There is only one female god in Maori Legend. She is the daughter of Tane Mahuta, god of the Forest and Birds, and Hineahuone, woman made from earth.    Today She is known as Hinenuitepo but she began life as Hinetitama, the Dawn Maiden.

Hinenuitepo - Goddess of the Night /// There is only one female god in Maori Legend. She is the daughter of Tane Mahuta, god of the Forest and Birds, and Hineahuone, woman made from earth. Today She is known as Hinenuitepo but she began life as Hinetitama, the Dawn Maiden.

Nga waewae tapu - Maori exploration  The great explorer Kupe named a number of features in Wellington Harbour – including Matiu (Somes Island) and Mākaro (Ward Island), after his daughters. Kupe is on the right side of this panel, with Matiu and Mākaro at the bottom. On the left is the demigod Māui, and below him, the two taniwha (supernatural creatures) of Wellington Harbour, Ngake and Whātaitai.

Nga waewae tapu - Maori exploration The great explorer Kupe named a number of features in Wellington Harbour – including Matiu (Somes Island) and Mākaro (Ward Island), after his daughters. Kupe is on the right side of this panel, with Matiu and Mākaro at the bottom. On the left is the demigod Māui, and below him, the two taniwha (supernatural creatures) of Wellington Harbour, Ngake and Whātaitai.

Te ao hurihuri (The changing world), tukutuku (woven wall panel), 2013, by James and Catherine Schuster, Te Rōpū Raranga

Te ao hurihuri (The changing world), tukutuku (woven wall panel), 2013, by James and Catherine Schuster, Te Rōpū Raranga

Image of Taonga Whakairo. This taonga is in three sections. These are a centre panel of tukutuku, flanked by two poupou. The work is rich in symbolism as it depicts the main gods of the Māori pantheon that are associated with our work. The work is also a symbol of LINZ's historic past and of its core business today, of being the kaitiaki (guardian) and interpreter of land information, for New Zealand.

Image of Taonga Whakairo. This taonga is in three sections. These are a centre panel of tukutuku, flanked by two poupou. The work is rich in symbolism as it depicts the main gods of the Māori pantheon that are associated with our work. The work is also a symbol of LINZ's historic past and of its core business today, of being the kaitiaki (guardian) and interpreter of land information, for New Zealand.

Drippy Tiki by Greg Straight for Sale - New Zealand Art Prints

Drippy Tiki by Greg Straight for Sale - New Zealand Art Prints

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