Ramsay & Sons LW12 push loads one of their model D Tournapulls on a road job in Northland in the early 1960s. Ramsays were based in Dargaville

Ramsay & Sons LW12 push loads one of their model D Tournapulls on a road job in Northland in the early 1960s. Ramsays were based in Dargaville

This is the larger, more powerful cousin, the LW16T. As can be seen a front engine configuration was chosen for this model. Sales of this type exceeded that of the LW12 by four to one. The machine is pictured outside of LeTourneau-Westinghouse’s manufacturing facility in Rydalmere, Australia in 1959.

This is the larger, more powerful cousin, the LW16T. As can be seen a front engine configuration was chosen for this model. Sales of this type exceeded that of the LW12 by four to one. The machine is pictured outside of LeTourneau-Westinghouse’s manufacturing facility in Rydalmere, Australia in 1959.

With a full blade load on, the LW12 was suited for most utility jobs, especially cleanup work where its speed made it a very versatile machine.

With a full blade load on, the LW12 was suited for most utility jobs, especially cleanup work where its speed made it a very versatile machine.

Another shot of the Goodman machine displays the machines compact size to good advantage. The LW12 was legally roadable and could be sent from job to job without having to be loaded on a transporter.

Another shot of the Goodman machine displays the machines compact size to good advantage. The LW12 was legally roadable and could be sent from job to job without having to be loaded on a transporter.

Goodman Earthmovers of Waikanae, a big LeTourneau/Wabco user, also has an LW12 or two. This particular example is fitted with a non-standard parallelogram ripper, the usual fitment being a radial arc type. This particular machine is the one the author operated for a short while

Goodman Earthmovers of Waikanae, a big LeTourneau/Wabco user, also has an LW12 or two. This particular example is fitted with a non-standard parallelogram ripper, the usual fitment being a radial arc type. This particular machine is the one the author operated for a short while

Prototype LW12 on test at the compays plant at Rydalmere, New South Wales. As can be seen, early attempts at creating a wheel tractor dozer put the engine in front of the operator. The machines fuel tank is to the operators left. The later LW16 Tournatractor was also produced in this configuration

Prototype LW12 on test at the compays plant at Rydalmere, New South Wales. As can be seen, early attempts at creating a wheel tractor dozer put the engine in front of the operator. The machines fuel tank is to the operators left. The later LW16 Tournatractor was also produced in this configuration

Factory shot of a bare, unequipped LeTourneau-Westinghouse LW12. It was quite a modern design for 1959. Mounting lugs for the blades hydraulic cylinders can be clearly seen

Factory shot of a bare, unequipped LeTourneau-Westinghouse LW12. It was quite a modern design for 1959. Mounting lugs for the blades hydraulic cylinders can be clearly seen

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