Good luck to you!

It was common for service personnel to carry good luck charms with them, particularly during times of conflict while in stressful environments and far away from home. We have a small collection of good luck charms here at the Air Force Museum of New Zealand. These objects were often kept in a pocket to rally courage and strength and to remind the carrier of loved ones back home.
7 Pins26 Followers
Royal Air Force doll carried as a mascot and good luck charm by pilot Flying Officer Jack Arthur Hoffeins. The purples ribbon from Jack's Memorial Cross is tied around the doll. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Royal Air Force doll carried as a mascot and good luck charm by pilot Flying Officer Jack Arthur Hoffeins. The purples ribbon from Jack's Memorial Cross is tied around the doll. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Wooden Japanese charm recovered from a Japanese soldier's uniform in the Pacific during WWII. The characters have been translated as "Daimyjin," the name of a Shinto god, so this is most likely a good luck charm (omamori). From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Wooden Japanese charm recovered from a Japanese soldier's uniform in the Pacific during WWII. The characters have been translated as "Daimyjin," the name of a Shinto god, so this is most likely a good luck charm (omamori). From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Two pieces of coal found in the pocket of Service Dress jacket belonging to Ray J.  Linton, probably meant as a good luck charm. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Two pieces of coal found in the pocket of Service Dress jacket belonging to Ray J. Linton, probably meant as a good luck charm. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Porcelain doll found in plum puddings sent to New Zealand troops stationed at Gallipoli during World War One. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Porcelain doll found in plum puddings sent to New Zealand troops stationed at Gallipoli during World War One. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Cuff link with Japanese characters, translated at "Good Luck" or "Good Fourtune". From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Cuff link with Japanese characters, translated at "Good Luck" or "Good Fourtune". From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Bronze tiki belonging to flying Officer Alfred Henry Knewstubb. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Bronze tiki belonging to flying Officer Alfred Henry Knewstubb. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Black cat brooch belonging to A.H. Knewstubb. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Black cat brooch belonging to A.H. Knewstubb. From the collection of the Air Force Museum of New Zealand.

Pinterest
Search