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Kawakawa, Ginger, Lemon | Maori inspired popsicles. Pre-dessert course for the Hiakai pop up at Hillside Kitchen & Cellar in Wellington. Photo courtesy of: hiakai.co.nz This wonderful innovative chef is taking Maori kai to a new level indeed. Monique Fiso is inspiring a new generation of Maori to bring a modern twist into their kitchens with her very unique take on traditional dishes even incorporating Rongoa into creations. Just Devine #moniquefiso #inspiration #kai #thebohemianstylist

Kawakawa, Ginger, Lemon | Maori inspired popsicles. Pre-dessert course for the Hiakai pop up at Hillside Kitchen & Cellar in Wellington. Photo courtesy of: hiakai.co.nz This wonderful innovative chef is taking Maori kai to a new level indeed. Monique Fiso is inspiring a new generation of Maori to bring a modern twist into their kitchens with her very unique take on traditional dishes even incorporating Rongoa into creations. Just Devine #moniquefiso #inspiration #kai #thebohemianstylist

Kumarahou Flowers

Kumarahou Flowers

Koromiko    Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease.  Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Koromiko Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease. Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Plant Medicine Books | Plant Medicine of Aotearoa. Volume 1 http://www.fishpond.co.nz/Books ...

Plant Medicine Books | Plant Medicine of Aotearoa. Volume 1 http://www.fishpond.co.nz/Books ...

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Medicinal Native Plants of New Zealand

Maori Rongoa

10 Healing Weeds That May Grow In your Backyard - PositiveMedPositiveMed | Stay Healthy. Live Happy

10 Healing Weeds That May Grow In your Backyard

10 Healing Weeds That May Grow In your Backyard - PositiveMedPositiveMed | Stay Healthy. Live Happy

Bream Bay Kindergarten: Opening and closing Karakia

Bream Bay Kindergarten: Opening and closing Karakia

KOHEKOHE ELIXIR OF WEIGHT LOSS AND HORMONE BALANCE - We Love Rongoa

KOHEKOHE ELIXIR OF WEIGHT LOSS AND HORMONE BALANCE - We Love Rongoa

Poroporo,Parts used; berries, leaves, inner bark.The berries are poisonous when eaten green but safe when ripe. The leaf was used for the itch, a poultice for sores, chronic eczema, and psoriasis,sores and ulcers.Internally as an effective contraceptive. A factory was established at Waitara in 1978 for extracting the steroid hormone extract to be added to contraceptive pills and for treating rheumatoid arthritis however the plant closed in 1981.

Poroporo,Parts used; berries, leaves, inner bark.The berries are poisonous when eaten green but safe when ripe. The leaf was used for the itch, a poultice for sores, chronic eczema, and psoriasis,sores and ulcers.Internally as an effective contraceptive. A factory was established at Waitara in 1978 for extracting the steroid hormone extract to be added to contraceptive pills and for treating rheumatoid arthritis however the plant closed in 1981.

Kōwhai    The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back.  A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kōwhai The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back. A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.